Book Gallery

Institutional Corruption

Book: Shooting to Kill: the ethics of police and military use of lethal force

Author: Seumas Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Description: In this book, Seumas Miller develops distinctive philosophical analyses of corruption, collective responsibility and integrity systems, and applies them to cases in both the public and the private sectors. Using numerous well-known examples of institutional corruption, he explores a variety of actual and potential anti-corruption measures. The result is a wide-ranging, theoretically sophisticated and empirically informed work on institutional corruption and how to combat it. Part I defines the key concepts of corruption, power, collective responsibility, bribery, abuse of authority and nepotism; Part II discusses anti-corruption and integrity systems, corruption investigations and whistle-blowing; and Part III focuses on corruption and anti-corruption in specific institutional settings, namely policing, finance, business and government. Integrating theory with practical approaches, this book will be important for those interested in the philosophy and ethics of corruption as well as for those who work to combat it.

 

 

 

Shooting to Kill: The ethics of police and military use of lethal force

Book: Shooting to Kill: the ethics of police and military use of lethal force

Author: Seumas Miller

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Description: In this book, philosopher Seumas Miller analyzes the various moral justifications and moral responsibilities involved in the use of lethal force by police and military, relying on a distinctive normative teleological account of institutional roles. Miller covers a variety of urgent and morally complex topics, including police shootings of armed offenders, police shooting of suicide-bombers, targeted killing, autonomous weapons, humanitarian armed intervention, and civilian immunity.

Ethics in an Age of Surveillance: Personal Information and Virtual Identities

Author: Adam Henschke

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

People increasingly live online, sharing publicly what might have once seemed private, but at the same time are enraged by extremes of government surveillance and the corresponding invasion into our private lives. In this enlightening work, Adam Henschke re-examines privacy and property in the age of surveillance in order to understand not only the importance of these social conventions, but also their moral relevance. By analyzing identity and information, and presenting a case for a relation between the two, he explains the moral importance of virtual identities and offers an ethically robust solution to design surveillance technologies. This book should be read by anyone interested in surveillance technology, new information technology more generally, and social concepts like privacy and property.

Police and Law Enforcement Ethics


Editor:
Seumas Miller

Publisher: Routledge

This new collection is a contribution to the literature on police ethics, specifically the philosophical literature on ethical issues that arise in police enforcement of the law.

Corruption and Anti-Corruption in Policing—Philosophical and Ethical Issues


Author:
Seumas Miller

Publisher: Springer

High levels of police corruption have been a persistent historical tendency in police services throughout the world. While the general area of concern in this book is with police corruption and anti-corruption, the focus is on certain key philosophical and ethical issues that arise for police organisations confronting corruption. On the normative account proffered in this book the principal institutional purpose of policing is the protection of legally enshrined moral rights and the principal institutional anti-corruption arrangement is what is referred to as an integrity system. The latter includes oversight bodies with investigative powers and internal affairs departments  as well as specific devices such as early warning indicators, professional reporting mechanisms and integrity tests. Key concepts analysed in the book include corruption, noble cause corruption and collective moral responsibility. The key ethical issues analysed include investigative independence, professional reporting, covert operations and integrity tests.

Who Should Die?: The Ethics of Killing in War


Author:
Who Should Die?: The Ethics of Killing in War

Editors: Ryan Jenkins, Michael Robillard, and Bradley Jay Strawser

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Description: War remains a grim fixture of the human landscape, and because of its tremendous and ongoing impact on the lives of millions of people, has always attracted the attention of careful, rigorous, and empathetic moral philosophers. And while war is synonymous with death and ruin, very few people are willing to surrender to moral nihilism about war–the view that all really is fair. At the center of debates about war remains the most important question that faces us during battle: whom are we allowed to kill?

This volume collects in one place the most influential and groundbreaking philosophical work being done on the question of killing in war, offering a “who’s who” of contemporary scholars debating the foundational ethical questions surrounding liability to harm. In ten essays, it expands upon and provides new and updated analyses that have yet to be captured in a single work. Essays explore questions such as: Are some soldiers more deserving of death than others? Should states allow soldiers to conscientiously object (to opt out of war) on a case-by-case basis? Can a theory of rights best explain when it is permissible to kill in war? When are we allowed to violently resist oppression that is itself nonviolent? Is there anything wrong with targeting people with autonomous weapons?

As a convenient and authoritative collection of such discussions, this volume is uniquely suited for university-level teaching and as a reference for ethicists, policymakers, stakeholders, and any student of the morality of killing in war.

Designing in Ethics

Book: Designing in Ethics

Editors: Jeroen van den Hoven, Seumas Miller, and Thomas Pogge

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Description: Many of our interactions in the twenty-first century – both good and bad – take place by means of institutions, technology, and artefacts. We inhabit a world of implements, instruments, devices, systems, gadgets, and infrastructures. Technology is not only something that we make, but is also something that in many ways makes us. The discipline of ethics must take this constitutive feature of institutions and technology into account; thus, ethics must in turn be embedded in our institutions and technology. The contributors to this book argue that the methodology of ‘designing in ethics’ – addressing and resolving the issues raised by technology through the use of appropriate technological design – is the way to achieve this integration. They apply their original methodology to a wide range of institutions and technologies, using case studies from the fields of healthcare, media and security. Their volume will be important for philosophical practitioners and theorists alike.